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Bible’s Covered Bridge, at Warrensburg, shown in the background, was officially established as a historical structure in 1975 as the result of efforts led by the Greene County Heritage Trust, which also renovated the exterior of the bridge in the 1970s. Through a lengthy process involving the Trust and numerous governmental and commercial entities, the bridge was completely restored by early November 2004, when this ribbon-cutting ceremony took place. Young Andrew Bible, great-grandson of E.A. Bible, who had the covered bridge built in the 1920s, cut the ribbon for the rededication of the restored bridge. Shown in the photo, left to right, are: Tom Little, of Tri-Angle Construction; Jack Ragsdale, of Georgia Granite Co.; Carl Edwards, of Tri-Angle Construction; then-Greene County Mayor Roger Jones; Andrew Bible; Andrew’s father, Tom Bible; Sam Miller, then-vice-president of the Heritage Trust; and then-Greene County Highway Supt. J.C. Jones. Standing behind them, in green blazers and displaying the banner of the Greene County Partnership, are members of the Partnership’s Green Coat Ambassadors. | Greene County Heritage Trust (9).jpg

Bible’s Covered Bridge, at Warrensburg, shown in the background, was officially established as a historical structure in 1975 as the result of efforts led by the Greene County Heritage Trust, which also renovated the exterior of the bridge in the 1970s. Through a lengthy process involving the Trust and numerous governmental and commercial entities, the bridge was completely restored by early November 2004, when this ribbon-cutting ceremony took place. Young Andrew Bible, great-grandson of E.A. Bible, who had the covered bridge built in the 1920s, cut the ribbon for the rededication of the restored bridge. Shown in the photo, left to right, are: Tom Little, of Tri-Angle Construction; Jack Ragsdale, of Georgia Granite Co.; Carl Edwards, of Tri-Angle Construction; then-Greene County Mayor Roger Jones; Andrew Bible; Andrew’s father, Tom Bible; Sam Miller, then-vice-president of the Heritage Trust; and then-Greene County Highway Supt. J.C. Jones. Standing behind them, in green blazers and displaying the banner of the Greene County Partnership, are members of the Partnership’s Green Coat Ambassadors.

Bible’s Covered Bridge, at Warrensburg, shown in the background, was officially established as a historical structure in 1975 as the result of efforts led by the Greene County Heritage Trust, which also renovated the exterior of the bridge in the 1970s. Through a lengthy process involving the Trust and numerous governmental and commercial entities, the bridge was completely restored by early November 2004, when this ribbon-cutting ceremony took place. Young Andrew Bible, great-grandson of E.A. Bible, who had the covered bridge built in the 1920s, cut the ribbon for the rededication of the restored bridge. Shown in the photo, left to right, are: Tom Little, of Tri-Angle Construction; Jack Ragsdale, of Georgia Granite Co.; Carl Edwards, of Tri-Angle Construction; then-Greene County Mayor Roger Jones; Andrew Bible; Andrew’s father, Tom Bible; Sam Miller, then-vice-president of the Heritage Trust; and then-Greene County Highway Supt. J.C. Jones. Standing behind them, in green blazers and displaying the banner of the Greene County Partnership, are members of the Partnership’s Green Coat Ambassadors.

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